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Birmingham Bar Association Bulletin

Diversity Many African Americans and their families moved to larger cities, such as Birmingham, to find employment and places to live. They needed goods and services to survive and prosper, yet they were not allowed to take out loans from white-owned banks or shop in white-only stores. To create more opportunities for people like them, many African Americans joined resources to begin their own businesses. For example, in 1890, Reverend William Pettiford, B.H. Hudson, Peter F. Clark, A.H. Parker, and J.O. Diffay established the Alabama Penny Savings Bank in Birmingham to offer loans and other banking services to African Americans. Many African American doctors, lawyers, tailors, jewelists, accountants, beauticians, and architects, such as Dr. A.M. Brown, Dr. Walter Brown, attorney E.A. Brown, Dr. William Lacey, Dr. William Brown, and attorney L.L. Chambliss, maintained offices in the Pythian Temple Building, a building which still stands today.3 Mason’s candor and amazing ability to tell the stories of this important history of our nation and city can help us gain a better understanding of “where we are” because of our past. As Mason stated so well, only by looking back and appreciating our history, can we truly comprehend the present. Thank you, Mason, for your time, your intellect, your knowledge, and your wit. G Martha Reeves Cook, Contributor ENDNOTES: 1 A second Morning with Mason will take place in the fall of 2018. 2 Thank you to Dennis Pantazis and the law firm of Wiggins, Childs, Pantazis, Fisher & Goldfarb for allowing the use of their beautiful, historic building for special BBA occasions such as this event. 3 Mason prepared a detailed set of notes for this event. If you would like a copy, please email Diane Partain at diane@ mrcattorney.com. personal injury, and other civil matters. Ashley is an active member of the Birmingham Bar Association, serves on the editorial board for the Birmingham Bar Bulletin, and serves on the Board of Trustees for the Birmingham Ashley Crank, Contributor Continued from page 11 Think Before You Tweet: evaluate the ramifications of the following evidentiary principles when evaluating the admissibility of social media content: relevancy, prejudice, authentication, hearsay, and the best evidence rule. For instance, Fed. R. Evid. 104(a) and 104(b) are "inextricably intertwined" with Fed. R. Evid. 901. In light of the constant evolution of social media content, screen captures and printouts may not always be enough to authenticate social media evidence. Authentication will likely continue to evolve with the evolution of social media content. Practitioners may choose to employ additional discovery methods to ensure authentication of social media content, such as, obtaining deposition testimony, subpoenaing information directly from social media providers or reviewing a purported author's computer history, if available. Regardless, compliance with Stout by Stout, at least as it relates to Facebook content, appears to be the guiding case as it relates to admissibility and authentication in the Eleventh Circuit. Ashley Crank is an Associate at Christian & Small LLP where she maintains a civil litigation practice focusing on insurance defense, insurance coverage, Legal Aid Society. G Birmingham Bar Bulletin/ Summer 2018 35


Birmingham Bar Association Bulletin
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