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Special Interest Anchors are beliefs, values, attitudes, behaviors and group norms. A belief is a perceived link between any two aspects that exist in a person’s world. A value is a special kind of belief that usually doesn’t change and is of a personal nature; therefore, people react strongly if their values are attacked or questioned. An attitude is a readiness to respond to an idea, object, or course of action, expressed with statements that clarify a position. Finally, behaviors provide a good anchor for motivation to repeat or change certain actions. Combining anchors with an emotional story can lead the horse to water and make him drink! Logos is the appeal toward logical reason such that an argument needs to be sound and, well, logical to the audience. The argument itself must be organized, simple and not rambling. You will lose your audience if you go on and on unnecessarily. Logos is concerned with the content, structure and argumentation of a speech. Again, you must convey your argument in an appropriate form for how, where and to whom you are giving your speech. It is important to note that it is difficult for an audience, especially one like a jury with widely varying backgrounds, to comprehend and analyze an argument. An attorney, therefore, must be able to communicate in an understandable way. We have all heard that we now live in a 15-second-society, which is why commercials and news blips are becoming shorter than they used to be. There is also something called the 10 Minute Rule, which reasons that an audience’s attention begins to wane after ten minutes.2 An orator, therefore, should try to keep his argument as clear and concise as possible. If an argument cannot be concluded in as short a time as 10 minutes, consider breaking it up into 10 minute increments that you can ease into logically. Certainly, the art of persuasion and speech-giving is better crafted and developed over time. And we all know there are some people who are naturally born with an amazing talent for story-telling. Just because you are not gifted with such a talent or even have a fear of public speaking, you should not, however, be disheartened or dissuaded from making arguments. One of the best tips is to be prepared. If you know all of your facts, your evidence and your law, you can have the confidence to put your game face on and fake it! Just remember to always keep in mind your appearance, who your audience is and that your argument is logical. G ENDNOTES 1. http://www.european-rhetoric.com/ethos-pathoslogos modes-persuasion-aristotle/ 2. http://www.thereluctantspeakersclub.com/ blog/2012/07/do-youneed emotional-jumpleads to-keep-youraudience engaged/ Jennifer W. (Jennie) Pickett practices with Smith, Spires, Peddy, Hamilton & Coleman, PC. Fastest smartest malpractice insurance. Period. 800.906.9654 GilsbarPRO.com Birmingham Bar Bulletin/ Summer 2017 35


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