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Book Reviews Other markers include the Birmingham Public Library, the Linn-Henley Research Library, Birmingham Southern College, Cahaba Project “Slagheap Village,” First Baptist Church of Trussville, Hosea Holcombe, Howard College, Howard College (#2), Jeff erson County Courthouses, Jeff erson Warriors, Jordan Home (this home at 2834 Highland Avenue was the home of Dr. Mortimer H. Jordan and his wife Florence E. Mudd. Dr. Jordan was a famous doctor in early Birmingham history (one of the buildings at UAB is named after him, and his wife was the daughter of William S. Mudd, builder of Arlington Plantation), Oxmoor Iron Furnaces, Pioneer Massey Cemetery, Roebuck Springs Historic District, Ruhama Baptist Church, Samford University, School of Medicine at UAB (this marker mentions “Th e Medical College of Alabama opened in Birmingham with a four-year program in 1945 and became the School of Medicine in 1969. Th e Medical Center gradually emerged as other schools were established...” (Th is reviewer’s father as fi rst Dean was the individual who established the Medical College of Alabama in 1945), Site of Howard College, Tannehill Ironworks, United States Pipe and Foundry Company and Wilson’s Raiders. Again, Birmingham Bar members might fi nd this book interesting in reviewing historical sites in the county from whence they were born or raised. Th e book is described as a project of the Alabama Historical Association as follows: “For over 50 years the Alabama Historical Association’s Historical Marker program has been helping local groups commemorate the state’s history. Th e Association is a private organization of people interested in Alabama’s past. Th e Association’s Marker Committee serves to check the accuracy of the textual information carried on any proposed marker and attests to a site’s historic importance.” Th en it describes how an organization can establish a new marker and submit it for approval with proposed text. Th is too is a valuable resource for those interested in Alabama history. Th e Disaster Artist, My Life Inside Th e Room, Th e Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell Simon and Schuster, New York, 288 pages Th e Disaster Artist is a book about a movie in which the author Greg Sestero participated as an actor in one of the leading roles. Th e movie was the “brain child ?” of a mysterious character named Tommy Wiseau. Wiseau is one of the most enigmatic persons ever encountered by Hollywood, reviewers, interviewers, and others who have attempted to learn of his background, source of money, and place of birth (probably Poland). Th e only revealing fact that Wiseau will reveal to anyone is that he was from Louisiana. Sestero met Wiseau in an acting class and became intrigued with Wiseau’s overacting technique, his unusual appearance (long black dyed hair) and his mode of speaking with a thick European accent. Wiseau in this memoir decides he is going to make a movie - Th e Room - which some have called the Citizen Kane of bad movies. Th is book will inspire the reader to search the internet and fi nd scenes from “Th e Room” out of pure curiosity. Th is movie has become a cult classic of how not to make a movie. Everything about “Th e Room” is intriguing including whether or not it was made as a disingenuous joke, or whether it was truly good intentions gone awry. Th e Disaster Artist book has now been made into a movie itself which had its premiere on March 17, 2017. Presently, cult movie fans have parties, show the fi lm, and during the fi lm repeat the awful acting lines, throw spoons at the movie, and generally “act out” the movie while it is being shown. Also, Th e Room movie has inspired others to emulate it in that it has become an industry in and of itself. (See Th e Room video game). Th e source of the money for the production ($6,000,000) has never been revealed by Wiseau. He wrote the play/ movie, produced it, directed it, starred in it, all without having any knowledge of fi lm making. Th e result is a laughable, bizarre experience. For instance, Wiseau will steal famous lines from other movies and perform them himself in Th e Room such as “Lisa, you are tearing me apart” from James Dean’s line in Rebel Without A Cause. Other examples are too numerous to mention here. Th e book itself has won several awards for “best non-fi ction” and is an easy read and entertaining. It is presented to the readers of Th e Bulletin as a discretionary form of distraction. G Editor Robert R. Kracke 32 Birmingham Bar Association


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