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Artificial Intelligence Lloyd W. Gathings A Limited Human Intelligence Takes On Artificial Intelligence in the Law Office The Elements of Style, by William Strunk, Jr. and E.B. White, a "go-to" reference for many writers, does not, to the best of my knowledge, have a recommendation to start an article with a disclaimer of a lack of knowledge or limited human intelligence. The reference in the title to limited human intelligence is to alert you to the fact that this article is written from a practical lawyer's viewpoint to suggest what can help in the practice of law and what cannot, and what items lie somewhere in-between. If you are looking for a dissertation comparing the merits of Boolean vs. SQL in legal software, or any like discussion, then you need to read elsewhere. On the other hand, if you want a practical working knowledge of or introduction to the artificial intelligence software available for the law office, then read on. The first thing to understand is that there is no universally accepted definition of "artificial intelligence." Dictionary. com, which is based on the Random House Dictionary, defines artificial intelligence as "the capacity of a computer to perform operations analogous to learning and decision making in humans, as by an expert system, a program for CAD or CAM, or a program for the perception and recognition of shapes in computer vision systems." The basic definition seems appropriate, but the examples may go somewhat wide of the mark. The British Dictionary defines artificial intelligence, in general, as "the study of the modeling of human mental functions by computer programs," which is probably a definition with which most people would agree. The British Dictionary definition of "artificial intelligence in science" is even more appropriate for this discussion: "The ability of a computer or other machine to perform actions thought to require intelligence. Among these actions are logical deduction and inference, creativity, the ability to make decisions based on past experience or insufficient or conflicting information, and the ability to understand spoken language." One of the prime examples of artificial intelligence is the computer software that Google uses to control its driverless cars. The intelligent personal assistants in smartphones emerged from lengthy research into artificial intelligence. Watson, the invention 10 Birmingham Bar Association


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