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Birmingham Bar Association Spring 2014

merely bring these books to your attention should you be interested in this subject matter. It is in no way intended as a tool for proselytization, nor is it presented for religious purposes. In this reviewer’s case, the intellectual curiosity becomes more and more focused as each birthday is approached. Th e closer one gets to the “lights out” phase of life, the more intense the intellectual curiosity. Th ese books were read on a Kindle Fire, therefore, your reviewer would be hesitant to quote the price of these books, though each of them can probably be purchased for approximately $10.00 or less. Good luck and happy after-life. Editor Robert R. Kracke show and he has spoken to audiences all over America concerning his experience. Th is is obviously a popular and, to some, a paranormal subject. It would seem to this reviewer that catalogers in the Library of Congress would sometimes have diffi culty classifying these books as autobiographies, biographies, non-fi ction or fi ction. Th is reviewer can attest that each of these books is fascinating reading and it is supposed that most readers gravitate toward these books out of a high level of intellectual curiosity as to what really does happen to each of us at death. Th e founder of this reviewer’s church once wrote in his autobiography that “the fi rst few moments after death will be the greatest adventure of life.” Henry Edmonds founded Independent Presbyterian Church and wrote several small books from which that quote was extracted. Th e more recent of these two books is the neurosurgeon’s story wherein he contracted a rare form of bacteria which caused him to go into a coma for six or eight days. He came out of the coma and began to relate his experiences while in the coma. His story reminds this reviewer of the words from a famous hymn, which says, “I was blind but now I see.” Th e purpose of this review is to e Last Lion Winston Spencer Churchill Defender of the Realm 1940-1965 Little Brown and Company 2012    1182 pages Book Reviews Th is last volume of the three written under this title (Th e Last Lion) is notably authored by William Manchester and Paul Reid. Th e fi rst two volumes, Th e Last Lion: Visions of Glory, published in 1983 and Th e Last Lion: Alone, published in 1988, were written solely by William Manchester. Interestingly, Manchester gave up this project toward the end of his life. No explanation was given by him as to why he did it; however, he did arrange for Paul Reid to fi nish the last volume. Of course, this volume covers the beginning of World War II through 1965 and is based, as the other volumes were, on memoranda and diaries, which are usually fairly reliable sources but for the egos in the memos and diaries. It is a laborious read, 1182 pages, and distinctly describes Churchill as fi ghting until the last man. In that regard, Churchill opposed the Nuremburg trials in that it would send a signal to future war mongers that they should fi ght to the last man or they will face trial and execution. Th is reviewer has long been an admirer of Winston Churchill in that without him, England would probably not be what it is today. Churchill’s own ego shines through with his opinions of others and himself. “We are all worms but I am a glowworm.” Obtainable at $40.00. G Birmingham Bar Bulletin/ Spring 2014 21


Birmingham Bar Association Spring 2014
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