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African-Americans, but of many other minorities as well. Th ere is an entire chapter of the Kennedy book describing the 1963 marches in Birmingham and the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church. Th ere is also an interesting comparison of the Birmingham Editor Robert R. Kracke the same conservative commentator who appears on television. However, many readers may not know that he was an honors history graduate, taught history at a high school in Florida and has two post-graduate degrees (one from Harvard). Of course, both books have “civil rights” running through them as an underlying theme: the Lincoln book with the Emancipation Proclamation and the Kennedy book with the enforcement of civil rights in the early 60s. Th e civil rights efforts of John F. Kennedy led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act signed into law by Kennedy’s successor, Lyndon Johnson. When one reads these books, that thread of civil rights runs as woven cloth behind each thought presented, which resulted in great progress in advancing the civil rights of not only events and a simultaneous demonstration in Vietnam by Buddhist priests picturing one of them self-immolating with gasoline in protest of the Vietnam war. Either of these books can be purchased at local book stores or electronically for $20 to $28. G In 2012, Jack B. Hood published a fourth novel in his “Banjo”“Banjo Songs.”  Sam Stone, a retired ” series, called Assistant U.S. Attorney in Birmingham, AL, defends a Pakistani-American physician who is accused of murdering his brother due to an attempted honor killing in the family. Praise for Jack B. Hood’s Banjo Songs: “Great courtroom drama.” --Bobby Lee Cook, Trial Lawyer-Summerville, GA “A good old fashion banjo experience.” --Herb Trotman, Banjo Expert-Homewood, AL Available as an E-Book and in softcover from Amazon.com Birmingham Bar Bulletin/ Spring 2013 21


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